Monday, August 19, 2013

Nearly Everything to Know About Building Green

Martin Holladay's list of articles is very complete, and the comments section is also extremely helpful:
http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/musings/how-do-everything

This list is continually updated, which is good, since the field is always changing.

GreenbuildinginDenver aims to fill in the blanks for Colorado's Front Range, and add topics where our expertise is helpful.

Check it often for the most unbiased and accurate methods to save energy in residential design and construction.

Sunday, August 18, 2013

Pin Foundations: A Very Green Foundation System

Here is a very  inexpensive and non-invasive foundation system that is slowly gaining popularity.  What is holding it back is typically conservative builders and structural engineers.

http://www.pinfoundations.com/green.htm

If your jurisdiction requires a soil report, then you may be able to find a geotechnical engineer who can work with the engineers at Pin Foundations and get the structural plans stamped.

The floor insulation and moisture vapor control details are important:  http://www.pinfoundations.com/docs/DP%20SKIRT%20WALL%20PRL%20TO%20JOISTS.pdf

In most cases, this system means:
1.  No excavation contractor
2.  No poured footings
3.  No concrete forming or stemwalls
4.  No concrete delivery trucks using diesel and disposing of waste concrete

Since the system eliminates conventional concrete work, many would consider it very green.  Concrete work is still tolerated by most green builders due to its durability and longevity, but the concrete industry is apparently one of the top contributors to global warming.

Monday, August 5, 2013

Saving Water and Floorspace

Maybe you've seen those toilets that save water by incorporating the handwashing sink into the lid of the toilet

There is also a way to retrofit a sink to the top of most side flush toilets for $140:


I like this idea, because I think you could save room in a house by putting the toilet and a shower in a smaller than normal bathroom, and have the main bath sink hovering in the bedroom as IKEA suggested in last year's catalog.   This reduces collisions between the two people sharing a three piece bath.  Saving water by reusing it is good too.

Also, some may criticize this toilet-top-hand-washing idea because there is no hot water available.  Well, most people don't wait for hot water at a conventional bath sink anyway.